Category archives for: Space & Physics

Total Eclipse: Solar Research Thrives in Darkness

Total Eclipse: Solar Research Thrives in Darkness

Sunspots, that seem as dim rags on a sun’s surface, called a photosphere, imply heated captivating activity. At 7,000 degrees Fahrenheit, these areas are cooler, and so darker, than a surrounding aspect area, that can strech temperatures of 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit.   Sunspot activity waxes and wanes during an 11-year cycle. During a solar maximum, […]

Everything Worth Knowing About … Surviving Space

Everything Worth Knowing About … Surviving Space

The Problem: Coming Down Is Hard to Do Floating in space might demeanour fun, though it’s also problematic. Humans, plants and other animals all grown to tarry 1 g of force, a normal sobriety they feel during Earth’s surface. The physique does reduction work in 0 gravity, and returning to normal sobriety strains muscles, hearts […]

Everything Worth Knowing About … Alien Contact

Everything Worth Knowing About … Alien Contact

Searches Past and Present 1960 Astronomer Frank Drake performs a initial complicated SETI experiment, called Project Ozma (after a Wizard of Oz character). With an 85-foot radio telescope in Green Bank, W.Va., he looks during dual sunlike stars for signs of visitor technology. 1961 A tiny SETI discussion takes place in Green Bank, during that Drake presents […]

Everything Worth Knowing About … a Dark Universe

Everything Worth Knowing About … a Dark Universe

How Do We Know It’s There? Space telescopes study a Big Bang’s vestige deviation (the vast x-ray background) have found a star is roughly ideally flat. That means light travels in true lines unless it encounters mass. Scientists contend this usually unequivocally creates clarity in a star packed with some kind of dim energy. Dark […]

How Big is a Biggest Possible Planet?

How Big is a Biggest Possible Planet?

KELT-11b, one of a physically largest objects known, is 40 percent wider than Jupiter and has a firmness of styrofoam. (Credit: Walter Robinson/Lehigh University) Last week, a group of astronomers reported a initial intensity find of an exomoon–a satellite orbiting a world around another star. Part of what is so distinguished about a news is […]

Everything Worth Knowing About … Asteroids

Everything Worth Knowing About … Asteroids

Our early solar complement was a furious place. Dust grains grew into pebbles, and pebbles became world-building planetesimals. These rocks spun around and bumped into any other in a pell-mell dance that left a route of waste in a wake. The ruins of these festivities sojourn strewn about a vast backyard. Many hilly and lead […]

Our Rocks, Ourselves

Our Rocks, Ourselves

Sounds good for a extended strokes, though a sum remained a mystery. What mixture were in that former mix? Could planets unequivocally emerge from dust? And did a solar complement arise from slow, still coagulation — or from accursed violence? As astronomers complicated Allende, they fast satisfied they had some of a answers in their […]

The Universe According to Emmy Noether

The Universe According to Emmy Noether

Illuminating Black Holes Noether’s theorem, however, is essential to some-more than only a hunt for new particles; it extends to all branches of physics. Harvard physicist Andrew Strominger, for example, has identified an gigantic series of symmetries associated to soft particles, that are particles that have no energy. These particles come in dual varieties: soothing […]

TRAPPIST-1 and a Seven Exoplanets

TRAPPIST-1 and a Seven Exoplanets

NASA’s news of a TRAPPIST-1 solar complement generated utterly a hum recently. The group announced that a system’s star — an ultra-cool dwarf only a bit bigger than Jupiter — has a collection of 7 Earth-sized planets encircling it. Researchers reliable dual of these planets in 2016 though upped a total to 7 after they […]

The Heroes of Science

The Heroes of Science

Albert Einstein: The Whole Package A throng barged past dioramas, potion displays and wide-eyed confidence guards in a American Museum of Natural History. Screams rang out as some runners fell and were trampled. Upon nearing during a harangue hall, a host pennyless down a door. The date was Jan. 8, 1930, and a New York […]

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